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7th EAI International Conference on Wireless and Satellite Systems (formerly PSATS)

July 6–7, 2015 | Bradford, Great Britain

Titles and Abstracts of Invited Speakers:

WiSATS Invited Talk - Title: From nature observation to autonomic sensor networks: The eternal battle between chaos and order

Author: Dr George Eleftherakis, University of Sheffield, UK

Abstract: The continuous exponential growth of the Internet, the Internet of Things and the introduction of cyber-physical systems contributes to an extreme increase in systems’ complexity and users demand for more advanced services leading to emergent applications software expanding to a variety of new domains. Wireless sensor networks and satellite systems are a very good example of distributed systems with extreme complexity, that should work well in dynamic environments. Architectures upon which distributed systems are built have moved from the initial centralized structured approaches, to more decentralized solutions that avoid the single point failure problem and offer better utilization of network resources. Moreover, unstructured approaches, where the overlay network follows a random graph distribution, have been introduced in order to cope with churn, heterogeneity, as well as to avoid the topology constraints which create significant problems in open dynamic environments that utilize structured architectures. Latest research efforts have concentrated on developing hybrid solutions which combine different paradigms in terms of decentralization and structure.

In this context, novel approaches used biological systems as inspiration in the design of artificial distributed systems aiming for solutions to various problems and challenges encountered. The rationale for looking in nature for inspiration is based on the notion that the structure, the behaviours of individuals and the laws that govern their interactions in decentralized biological systems existing in nature seems to solve seamlessly and effortlessly problems common in open distributed ICT systems. Large scale biological collectives like ant colonies and termite hives have shown a remarkable ability to produce a variety of useful behaviours including availability, scalability, self-organization and adaptation in a fully decentralized manner.

In this context, novel approaches used biological systems as inspiration in the design of artificial distributed systems aiming for solutions to various problems and challenges encountered. The rationale for looking in nature for inspiration is based on the notion that the structure, the behaviours of individuals and the laws that govern their interactions in decentralized biological systems existing in nature seems to solve seamlessly and effortlessly problems common in open distributed ICT systems. Large scale biological collectives like ant colonies and termite hives have shown a remarkable ability to produce a variety of useful behaviours including availability, scalability, self-organization and adaptation in a fully decentralized manner.

This talk is discussing the challenge of emergent phenomena, either positive or negative towards the behaviour of the system, and the continuous effort, that resembles the eternal battle between chaos and order, to understand them. It also identifies some possible research directions towards harnessing emergent phenomena in engineered systems, and presents how from investigating natural systems, a proposal for autonomous self-organised and self-adaptive sensor networks was realized.

 

WiSATS Invited Talk - Title: Ownership - A key factor in selection of smart grid communication technologies

Author: Dr. Bamidele Adebisi, Manchester Metropolitan Univeristy, UK

Abstract: Next generation electricity infrastructure also known as smart grid is already unfolding with new opportunities in terms of enhanced service delivery to consumer and efficiency of service providers. Reliable communication system is a key enabler of automation and control in such complex system. Though the communication eco-system is awash with many options, selecting the most suitable technology for the smart grid will depend on factors such as features, ease of management, ownership, scalability among others. In this talk, we present ownership as a key factor in selecting communication technology for the smart grid. Today, available media can be broadly grouped into wireless (WiFi, WiMAX, ZigBee, etc) and wireline (Ethernet, Fibre Optic, DSL, power line communication (PLC), etc). Apart from power line, communication services through other media are either provided by third party or require deployment of new network. While administration of the communication system of such critical infrastructure by a third party has some far-reaching implications in terms of security, the additional cost associated with deployment of new communication system is also undesirable; especially when it can be avoided. PLC leverages existing electricity network to provide the much-needed communication within smart grid thereby eliminating the need for third party communication services. In addition to the operational flexibility, this reduces security concerns and potentially transforms the power grid to a truly cross-functional infrastructure serving energy and communication purposes at reduced cost. Drawing from experience acquired from a EU FP7 smart grid project, and current EPSRC funded project, some important developments in PLC for smart grid and smart micro grid will be presented.

 

CASG2015 Invited Talk - Title: Project ADVANTAGE: Advanced Communications  and Information Processing in Smart Grid Systems

Author: Dr Aristides Kiprakis, Univeristy of Edingburgh, UK

Abstract: Smart Grid systems represent a significant new technology to provide more energy efficient power delivery systems that reduce carbon emissions and can handle a mix of energy sources from small scale renewable energy to large power stations. The design and implementation of the smart grid will be very complex, involving a large number of systems, layers and relationships. In order to make the infrastructure of smart grid systems work effectively, engineers need to be trained to have a detailed understanding of both power engineering and communications issues. Many related research projects to date involve either mainly power engineers or mainly communications/signal processing researchers, limiting the interaction and knowledge exchange between these two communities. However, smart grid engineers should be able to appreciate the power network that the smart grid is designed for and how to communicate and process data concerning the power grid, so that it can be controlled effectively. The ADVANTAGE (Advanced Communications and Information Processing in Smart Grid Systems) Initial Training Network, funded by the European Commission under Framework Programme 7, is a major interdisciplinary project between both power and communications engineers to train the next generation of engineers and scientists that will lead the development of this technology both within Europe and internationally.  This talk will discuss the main power and communication systems research challenges in smart grids and will introduce the scope, the structure and the expected outcomes of the ADVANTAGE project. 

 

CASG Invited Talk - Title: Smart Distribution Networks Planning: A Probablistic Approach

Author: Dr. Geev Mokryani, University of Bradford, UK

Abstract: The increasing penetration of intermittent renewable energy sources (RES) such as wind and solar creates technical challenges to both developers and distribution network operators (DNOs).  Although the RES integration has potential profits such as active power loses reduction, but restricted the DNOs and developers to allocate distributed generators (DGs).

A probabilistic method for the planning of active distribution networks (smart grids) is proposed. Uncertainties such as intermittent generation of photovoltaic (PV) cells, load demand and future load growth are modelled by probability density functions (PDFs). The method simultaneously minimizes the total energy losses of the lines from the point of view of DNOs and maximizes the energy generated by PVs over the planning horizon considering active management schemes such as coordinated voltage control and adaptive power factor control. Monte Carlo simulation method is employed to use the generated PDFs and the augmented ɛ-constraint method is used to solve the multi-objective optimization problem. The effectiveness of the proposed probabilistic method is demonstrated with a 9-bus distribution network.

 

NC Special Session Invited Talk - Title: Network coding over satellite: from theory to design and performance

Author: M.A. Vazquez-Castro

Abstract: The concept of network coding has greatly evolved since its inception. Theoretical and achievable performance have been obtained for a wide variety of networking assumptions and performance objectives. Even if powerful, such a broad applicability poses a challenge to a unified design approach over different communication networks and systems.

In this work, we propose a (non-reduccionistic) unified network coding design architectural framework where an ontology of abstraction domains is introduced rather than layer/system/network-specific assumptions and designs. The framework brings together network and system design and seems compatible with upcoming (more general) design frameworks such as software-defined networking, cognitive networking or network virtualization. We illustrate its applicability showing the case of network coding design over DVB-S2X/RCS.